Fun Facts on Energy Use

These interesting facts are worth looking into for those who are “energy aware”..
Facts About Energy Use in Commercial and Industrial Facilities

>Combined number of commercial buildings (4.8 million) and industrial facilities (350,000) in the United States: over 5 million1

>Combined annual energy costs for U.S. commercial buildings ($107.9 billion) and industrial facilities ($94.4 billion): $202.3 billion2

>Portion of energy in buildings used inefficiently or unnecessarily: 30 percent3

>Combined percentage of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions generated by commercial buildings (17 percent) and industrial facilities (28 percent): 45 percent4

>Percentage of energy use reduction targeted by the ENERGY STAR Challenge: 10 percent5

>Amount of money that would be saved if the energy efficiency of commercial and industrial buildings improved by 10 percent: $20 billion6

>Amount of greenhouse gas emissions that would be reduced if the energy efficiency of commercial and industrial buildings improved by 10 percent: equal to about 30 million vehicles7

>Number of registered automobiles in Illinois, New York, Ohio, and Texas combined: about 30 million8

Global Energy Facts:

> The approximate energy released in the burning of a wood match: 1 Btu9
> Total energy used in the U.S. each year: 99.89 quadrillion Btu10
> Portion of U.S. annual energy use created by the combustion of fossil fuels: 86 percent11
> Amount of global carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere in 2005: 6,000 million metric tons12
> U.S. contribution of global greenhouse gas emissions: about 20 percent13
> U.S. population relative to the world: 5 percent14
> Amount of greenhouse gas emissions that have increased between 1970 and 2004: 70 percent15
> Period of time in which 11 of the 12 warmest years on record have occurred: 1995 to 200616

Fast Facts on Energy Use Sources:

1. Energy Information Administration. “2003 CBECS Detailed Tables. Building Characteristics Tables for All Buildings (Including Malls), table A1.” December 2006. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/detailed_tables_2003.html>. Energy Information Administration. “2002 Energy Consumption by Manufacturers–Data Tables. Table 9.1 – Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings.” 8 March 2005. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs2002/data02/excel/table9.1_02.xls>.

2 Energy Information Administration. “2003 CBECS Detailed Tables. Table C4A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003.” December 2006. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/2003set14/2003html/c4a.html>. Energy Information Administration. “2002 Energy Consumption by Manufacturers–Data Tables. Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002.” 2002. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs2002/data02/excel/table7.9_02.xls>.

3 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ENERGY STAR program. “Useful Facts and Figures.” No date referenced. 1 June 2007 <http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=energy_awareness.bus_energy_use>.

4 Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas and Sinks: 1990-2005. “USEPA #430-R-07-002, Table 2-16: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector and Gas with Electricity-Related Emissions.” April 2007. 14 June 2007 <http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html>.
5 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ENERGY STAR program. “The ENERGY STAR Challenge: Build a BetterWorld 10% At a Time.” No date referenced. 1 June 2007 <http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=challenge.bus_challenge>.

6 Energy Information Administration. “2003 CBECS Detailed Tables. Table C4A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003.” December 2006. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/2003set14/2003html/c4a.html>. Energy Information Administration. “2002 Energy Consumption by Manufacturers–Data Tables. Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002.” 2002. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs2002/data02/excel/table7.9_02.xls>.

7 Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas and Sinks: 1990-2005. “USEPA #430-R-07-002, Table 2-16: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector and Gas with Electricity-Related Emissions.” April 2007. 14 June 2007 <http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html>. From Table 2-16 US Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector (CPPD Approved Source) Commercial Total CO2 = 1024.98 mmt Industrial – Electricity Related Only CO2 = 679.7 mmt Total CO2 = 1704.68 mmt Using US Climate Technology Cooperation Gateway Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator (CPPD Approved Source/Calculator) 1704.68 Million Metric Tons CO2 = 304,951,699 vehicles; 10% reduction for Challenge = approximately 30 million vehicles (Source: EPA).

8 U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration. “State Motor-Vehicle Registrations – 2005.” October 2006. 1 June 2007 <http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/ohim/hs05/htm/mv1.htm>. Illinois, New York, Ohio, and Texas add up to 29,951,758 registered vehicles.

9 Energy Information Administration. “Apples, Oranges, and BTU.” June 2006. 1 June 2007. <http://www.eia.doe.gov/neic/infosheets/apples.html>.

10 Energy Information Administration. “Energy Overview.” Annual Energy Review. Table 1.1. 2005. 1 June 2007 <http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/pdf/pages/sec1_5.pdf>.

11 Ibid. Total consumption is 99.89 Quadrillion Btu, Fossil Fuel Consumption is 85.96 Quadrillion Btu. Percent from fossil fuel is 85.96/99.89 = 86%

12 Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas and Sinks: 1990-2005. “USEPA #430-R-07-002, Table 2-16: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Economic Sector and Gas with Electricity-Related Emissions.”. April 2007. 14 June 2007 <http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html>.

13 World Resources Institute. “Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT).” 2007. 14 June 2007 http://cait.wri.org/cait.php?page=yearly>. U.S. is listed at 5,912 for 2004, while the world is listed at 27,043. Percentage for U.S.: 5,912/27,043 = 21.86%.

14 U.S. Census Bureau. “U.S. and World Population Clocks – POPClocks.” 22 November 2006. 25 May 2007 <http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html>. The U.S. is at 20.38% of world total.

15 IPCC, 2007: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. Summary for Policymakers, section B.

16 IPCC, 2007: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor and H.L. Miller (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. FAQ 3.1.

Source: www.Energystar.gov

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