Hydroelectric Plants operating in the US

Water is currently the leading renewable energy source used by electric utilities to generate electric power. Hydroelectric plants operate where suitable waterways are available; many of the best of these sites have already been developed. Generating electricity using water has several advantages. The major advantage is that water is a source of cheap power. In addition, because there is no fuel combustion, there is little air pollution in comparison with fossil fuel plants and limited thermal pollution compared with nuclear plants. Like other energy sources, the use of water for generation has limitations, including environmental impacts caused by damming rivers and streams, which affects the habitats of the local plant, fish, and animal life.

Table 1.13.B. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Conventional) Power by State by Sector, Year-to-Date through December 2009 and 2008
(Thousand Megawatthours)
Census Division and State Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers
2009 2008 Percent Change
New England 9,739 9,300 4.7 1,304 1,199 7,607 7,297 NM 6 820 798
Connecticut 623 556 12 52 46 572 510 — — — —
Maine 4,589 4,457 2.9 — — 3,813 3,695 — — 776 762
Massachusetts 1,276 1,156 10.4 295 271 964 871 NM 6 NM 8
New Hampshire 1,581 1,633 -3.2 409 396 1,163 1,230 — — NM 8
Rhode Island NM 5 — — — NM 5 — — — —
Vermont 1,664 1,493 11.4 548 486 1,090 986 — — NM 21
Middle Atlantic 31,176 29,298 6.4 23,838 22,902 7,290 6,327 — * 48 69
New Jersey NM 26 — — — NM 26 — — — —
New York 28,318 26,723 6 22,669 21,703 5,602 4,951 — * 48 69
Pennsylvania 2,821 2,549 10.7 1,169 1,199 1,651 1,350 — — — —
East North Central 4,106 3,942 4.1 3,717 3,559 209 194 NM * 179 189
Illinois 161 139 16.4 69 60 92 78 — — — —
Indiana 520 437 19.1 520 437 — — — — — —
Michigan 1,321 1,364 -3.2 1,205 1,248 92 91 — — NM 26
Ohio 498 386 28.9 498 386 — — — — — —
Wisconsin 1,605 1,616 -0.7 1,424 1,428 NM 25 NM * 156 163
West North Central 9,556 8,196 16.6 9,374 8,009 67 69 — — 115 118
Iowa 737 819 -10 734 816 NM 3 — — — —
Kansas NM 11 — — — NM 11 — — — —
Minnesota 696 727 -4.3 529 554 51 55 — — 115 118
Missouri 1,915 2,047 -6.5 1,915 2,047 — — — — — —
Nebraska 401 346 15.9 401 346 — — — — — —
North Dakota 1,475 1,253 17.8 1,475 1,253 — — — — — —
South Dakota 4,319 2,993 44.3 4,319 2,993 — — — — — —
South Atlantic 15,263 10,741 42.1 12,034 7,828 2,553 2,444 15 8 661 461
Delaware — — — — — — — — — — —
District of Columbia — — — — — — — — — — —
Florida 245 206 18.6 245 206 — — — — — —
Georgia 3,056 2,145 42.5 3,023 2,120 NM 2 — — NM 22
Maryland 1,948 1,974 -1.3 — — 1,948 1,974 — — — —
North Carolina 4,922 3,034 62.2 4,877 3,008 NM 16 13 8 NM 2
South Carolina 2,102 1,123 87.2 2,058 1,100 NM 22 NM 1 — —
Virginia 1,415 1,011 39.9 1,334 947 70 55 — — NM 9
West Virginia 1,576 1,248 26.3 497 446 461 375 — — 619 427
East South Central 24,589 13,700 79.5 24,583 13,695 NM 5 — — — —
Alabama 11,753 6,136 91.5 11,753 6,136 — — — — — —
Kentucky 3,353 1,917 74.9 3,347 1,912 NM 5 — — — —
Mississippi — — — — — — — — — — —
Tennessee 9,482 5,646 67.9 9,482 5,646 — — — — — —
West South Central 10,695 10,575 1.1 9,400 9,459 1,295 1,117 — — — —
Arkansas 4,195 4,660 -10 4,192 4,658 NM 2 — — — —
Louisiana 1,236 1,064 16.2 — — 1,236 1,064 — — — —
Oklahoma 3,762 3,811 -1.3 3,762 3,811 — — — — — —
Texas 1,501 1,039 44.4 1,446 989 55 50 — — — —
Mountain 31,353 32,254 -2.8 27,104 27,943 4,249 4,310 — — — —
Arizona 6,348 7,286 -12.9 6,348 7,286 — — — — — —
Colorado 2,058 2,039 0.9 1,891 1,878 167 161 — — — —
Idaho 9,507 9,363 1.5 8,799 8,664 708 699 — — — —
Montana 9,142 10,000 -8.6 5,798 6,567 3,344 3,433 — — — —
Nevada 2,446 1,751 39.7 2,426 1,742 NM 8 — — — —
New Mexico 301 312 -3.7 301 312 — — — — — —
Utah 697 668 4.3 688 659 NM 9 — — — —
Wyoming 854 835 2.2 854 835 — — — — — —
Pacific Contiguous 134,358 135,570 -0.9 132,373 133,861 1,938 1,661 45 46 NM 2
California 27,707 24,128 14.8 26,166 22,871 1,541 1,257 — — — —
Oregon 32,718 33,805 -3.2 32,479 33,558 238 247 — — — —
Washington 73,933 77,637 -4.8 73,727 77,432 158 157 45 46 NM 2
Pacific Noncontiguous 1,297 1,256 3.3 1,221 1,190 41 27 — — NM 39
Alaska 1,205 1,172 2.8 1,205 1,172 — — — — — —
Hawaii 93 84 10.1 NM 18 41 27 — — NM 39
U.S. Total 272,131 254,831 6.8 244,946 229,645 25,256 23,451 69 60 1,860 1,676
NM = Not meaningful due to large relative standard error or excessive percentage change.
Notes: See Glossary for definitions. Values for 2007 are final. Values for and 2008 and 2009 are preliminary. – See Technical Notes for a discussion of the sample design for the Form EIA-923, Form EIA-906 and Form EIA-920. Negative generation denotes that electric power consumed for plant use exceeds gross generation. Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Percent difference is calculated before rounding.

Water is currently the leading renewable energy source used by electric utilities to generate electric power. Hydroelectric plants operate where suitable waterways are available; many of the best of these sites have already been developed. Generating electricity using water has several advantages. The major advantage is that water is a source of cheap power. In addition, because there is no fuel combustion, there is little air pollution in comparison with fossil fuel plants and limited thermal pollution compared with nuclear plants. Like other energy sources, the use of water for generation has limitations, including environmental impacts caused by damming rivers and streams, which affects the habitats of the local plant, fish, and animal life.
Ice Harbor Dam.

Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Photographic Information Exchange.

Renewable Information Team

Publication: Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands, (To view the entire publication)
This report provides information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households, the tribe comparative electricity rate that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands. Hydropower

Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE)
A comprehensive source of information on state, local, utility, and selected federal incentives that promote renewable energy.
More tables on Hydroelectricity Formats
Table 1.2 Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source pdf xls
Table 1.3 Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source pdf xls
Table 1.11 Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source pdf xls
Table 1.12 U.S. Electric Net Summer Capacity www.eia.doe.gov

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