Magnetic Induction Cooking

Here’s the Basic Idea

“Cooking” is the application of heat to food. Indoor cooking is almost entirely done either in an oven or on a cooktop of some sort, though occasionally a grill or griddle is used.

Cooktops–which may be part of a range/oven combination or independent built-in units (and which are known outside the U.S.A. as “hobs”)–are commonly considered to be broadly divided into gas and electric types, but that is an unfortunate oversimplification.

In reality, there are several very different methods of “electric” heating, which have little in common save that their energy input is electricity. Such methods include, among others, coil elements (the most common and familiar kind of “electric” cooker), halogen heaters, and induction. Further complicating the issue is the sad habit of referring to several very different kinds of electric cookers collectively as “smoothtops,” even though there can be wildly different heat sources under those smooth, glassy tops.
woman cooking over open fire

As we said, cooking is the application of heat to food. Food being prepared in the home is very rarely if ever cooked on a rangetop except in or on a cooking vessel of some sort–pot, pan, whatever. Thus, the job of the cooker is not to heat the food but to heat the cooking vessel–which in turn heats and cooks the food. That not only allows the convenient holding of the food–which may be a liquid–it also allows, when we want it, a more gradual or more uniform application of heat to the food by proper design of the cooking vessel.

Cooking has therefore always consisted in generating substantial heat in a way and place that makes it easy to transfer most of that heat to a conveniently placed cooking vessel. Starting from the open fire, mankind has evolved many ways to generate such heat. The two basic methods in modern times have been the chemical and the electrical: one either burns some combustible substance–such as wood, coal, or gas–or one runs an electrical current through a resistance element (that, for instance, is how toasters work), whether in a “coil” or, more recently, inside a halogen-filled bulb.

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